Southern California and Arizona Area Cultural Calendar

2021/1/14

Virtual events available below.
Please note that events may be canceled or postponed and venues closed in coordination with the jurisdictions' official orders as countermeasures against COVID-19.


We continually update this calendar to include Japanese cultural events and activities in our jurisdiction. Please note, however, that events and organizations listed are not necessarily sponsored or endorsed by the Consulate General of Japan in Los Angeles. For detailed information about events, please contact the organizer/s directly. If your organization would like an event posted to this calendar, please submit requests to the Japan Information and Culture Center, Consulate General of Japan in Los Angeles for consideration.


Tel: (213) 617-6700 ext. 334
Fax: (213) 617-6728
Email
 

  1. Virtual Events
  2. Online Activities
  3. Arizona Area Events
  4. Southern California Area Events
  5. Arizona Area Ongoing Events
  6. Southern California Area Ongoing Events
  7. Special Events & Exhibitions at JICC

Virtual Events

What is "日本 (Japan)" for you? Video/Script Contest

Deadline: Until Sunday, January 31, 2021 | 11:59 p.m.
Terasaki Nibei Foundation

The Terasaki Nibei foundation is a non-profit organization established by Dr. Paul Terasaki. It provides a variety of cultural, informative classes and performances directed by Japanese Americans. The foundation has become a hub of cultural exchanges for people with deep, fond roots in America and Japan. As a mission of the foundation being the promotion of mutual understanding between America and Japan, we would like to begin hosting annual video/script contests for Japanese language learners in America.

Under the current COVID-19 pandemic, Japanese language learners have limited opportunities to showcase their learning outcome in and out of their class activities. The aim of the contest is to encourage learners who are studying Japanese to exhibit their language skills in a challenging context. The foundation expects this event will continue annually as far as there are enough applicants each year.The contest theme is “What is 日本 (Japan) for you?” The contestant will choose of these three themes;

1) Traditional culture (History; 伝統文化、時代劇)
2) Anime-pop culture (Contemporary; 現代劇、日常)
3) Language related (Experience as Japanese learners; 日本語学習関連)

The product formats are either; video (mp4, mov or other audio-visual formats), script (word, pdf or other text formats), or fictional essay (word, pdf or other text formats) that would be used for making a short film in the future.

Terms: Submission due will be January 31,2021. The results will be out in early March, 2021.
How to apply: Fill in the application form first. The organizer will send you the Dropbox link to upload your work.

For more information, click here.

Web Seijinshiki Coming of Age Celebration in LA 2021

Deadline: Sunday, January 31, 2021
Japanese Culture and Traditions dba NADESHIKO KAI ​
infonadeshiko.jct@gmail.com

Submit a Video Message!

We are looking for two types of short video messages (maximum 30 seconds, please) to commemorate the special Coming of Age celebration 2021:

1. A message FROM those who turn 20 in 2021: Include: self introduction including your name, your dreams and aspirations, a message to your parents/guardians. 30 seconds maximum.

2. A message TO those who turn 20 in 2021: Include: name and your congratulatory message to your special 20-year-old. 30 seconds maximum.

Email your short video message to: infonadeshiko.jct@gmail.com
Deadline: January 31, 2021

You will receive a Nadeshikokai original kimono mask for submitting a video message.
The mask will be mailed to you after receiving the information form, which will be emailed to you after your video is submitted.

U.S.-Japan Strategic Alliance

Thursday, January 14, 2021 | 3:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. (PDT)
Japan America Society of Chicago
kono@jaschicago.org

Mr. Keijiro ‘Kent’ Hora, CEO & President, Mitsubishi Electric US, and Chief Representative of the America’s Region will share his personal and professional perspective on raising a family overseas and the challenges and opportunities that come from blending differing work styles of the Japanese and American workforce. Mr. Hora’s career at Mitsubishi Electric spans multiple leadership assignments in the United States, Hong Kong and Japan across several industries. He will also address the growing importance of the U.S. – Japan strategic alliance and how Mitsubishi Electric is contributing to this key global partnership.

New Year J-Film Fest: WOOD JOB! | ウッジョブ~神去なあなあ日常~

Friday, January 15, 2021 4:00 p.m. - Monday, January 18, 2021 4:00 p.m. (PDT)
The Japan Information & Culture Center (JICC), Embassy of Japan in Washington D.C.
jicc@ws.mofa.go.jp

The Japan Information & Culture Center (JICC), Embassy of Japan and the Japan Commerce Association of Washington, D.C., Inc. are thrilled to jumpstart 2021 with our very first online New Year J-Film Fest!For three 72-hour weekend screenings in January, we have selected some amazing films from some of the latest and greatest talents in Japanese cinema.

Based on the best-selling novel by Miura Shion.

Director Yaguchi Shinobu (whose hit films include Waterboys, Swing Girls, & Survival Family) delivers a comedy full of laughter and emotional drama!

Having just graduated from high school with no idea of what to do next, 18-year-old Yuki finds himself suddenly cutting timber very far from his native home in a remote mountain village where cell phones don't work, no convenience stores exist, and there aren't any young people.

The work is extremely laborious and dangerous. Will Yuki be able to pass his forestry training program?

These virtual events are free and open to the online attendees in the US, however registration on Eventbrite is required in order to receive 72-hour streaming access to the virtual screenings via email. Registration for this film will begin on Wednesday, January 6 at 8:00 AM PDT. Register here.

2nd annual US-Japan Friendship Coming of Age Celebration

Sunday, January 17, 2021 | 3:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
JIA Foundation
(425) 417-5419 | contact@SeijinUSA.org

“SEIJIN-no- hi,” or Coming of Age Day, is a national Japanese holiday held on the second Monday of January to honor young adults who turned 20 years old in the past year. It is a way of welcoming them into society and is an essential rite of passage for the Japanese people. This symbolic moment of transitioning from childhood to adulthood marks the point at which the journey to become an honorable members of society begins.

On SEIJIN-no-hi, the Coming of Age ceremonies, SEIJIN-shiki, take place across Japan in city halls and other official centers. Customarily, people return to their hometowns for this celebration, the young women dressed in a gorgeous kimono called furisode for the ceremony and young men wearing hakama, the traditional men’s kimono.

It is an opportunity for the SEIJIN, the newly recognized adults, to receive encouraging advice for the next chapter of their lives as newly gained freedom and responsibilities are celebrated in the company of family members and old friends. This moment is one that people remember for the rest of their lives. It is a memory that we all look back on fondly.

JIA Foundation has brought this tradition to the USA. Our version of SEIJIN-shiki, the US-Japan Friendship Coming of Age Celebration, inaugurated in 2020 with more than 130 new SEIJIN in attendance.

Our SEIJIN-shiki is held in English and welcomes not only Japanese people but anyone who has an affinity for Japanese culture. It is an opportunity for Japanese culture to be shared, and for friendships to be built amongst multi-national attendees.

A new tradition was born. Our SEIJIN-shiki, the US-Japan Friendship Coming of Age Celebration, will celebrate new SEIJIN’s journey into adulthood every year. Register here.

Immigration in East Asia: How Grassroots Efforts Lead to Integration

Tuesday, January 19, 2021 | 4:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.
Japan Forum for Innovation and Technology

Until the early 2000s, Japan, South Korea and Taiwan all had restrictive immigration policies and effective social exclusion of immigrants. But since then, their paths have diverged. Whereas Taiwan has remained restrictive, Japan took incremental steps to expand immigrant services at the grassroots level, and South Korea enacted sweeping immigration reforms. What explains these divergent patterns of immigrant incorporation? A deep analysis of the role of civil society actors, including immigrants themselves, reveals how immigrant interests and actors shape public policy. Our conversation will explain the data base and discuss what these different paths mean for the three societies and economies. (Cosponsored by the Korea-Pacific Program.) Register here.

"Virtual" Bilingual Yoga

Wednesday, January 20, 2021 | 12:30 p.m. - 12:45 p.m.
Japan Foundation Los Angeles
(323) 761-7510

We would like to help during these trying times. Bilingual Yoga will be offered via JFLA Facebook LIVE! No need to change clothes or use a yoga mat; you will be seated in a chair at home and receive an instruction from our instructor in bilingual (English and Japanese). Easy and relaxed! Just go to JFLA's Facebook page. Stretch and refresh yourself with us at home! You don't need to have a Facebook account. The live video will show up on the main page. If you miss the video, you can still find it on our FaceBook or our YouTube channel.

 

Japan-U.S. Business Innovation: Japan Infrastructure Giants Harness U.S. Drone Technology

Wednesday January 20, 2021 | 4:00 p.m.
Japan Society of Northern California

From trains to bridges to communication towers, Japan dazzles visitors with its infrastructure. Developing infrastructure at these standards requires vigilance and maintenance – which is where Japan excels. However, the country faces systemic labor shortages that make manual maintenance of key infrastructure more challenging. One solution? Drones. Please join us at this cutting-edge program where experts will discuss:

– The state of the drone market in Japan;
– How infrastructure specialist JIW is utilizing drones for infrastructure maintenance; and
– Why enterprise drone provider Skydio has prioritized Japan in its international strategy.

Register here.

Shinto, Nature, and Impermanence: The Puzzle of the Ise Shrines

Thursday, January 21, 2021 | 4:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. (PDT)
The Japan Information & Culture Center (JICC), Embassy of Japan in Washington D.C.
jicc@ws.mofa.go.jp

Dr. Jordan Sand will explore the spiritual, historical, and architectural mysteries of Japan's famous Ise Shrine.

Japan's most famous sacred site is a pair of shrines in Ise that have been ritually rebuilt every twenty years for over twelve centuries. The shrines at Ise are often seen to embody the essential features of Shinto, Japan’s native creed, including a love of nature and acceptance of impermanence. Yet these are in fact modern ideas, unsupported by the historical record of Ise. Shrine priests and others have meticulously documented Ise for a millennium. These documents reveal a complex and eventful history, marked by war, natural disaster, and theft, as well as miracles and massive crowds of pilgrims. This presentation will introduce the history of Ise Shinto, explore the metaphors that have developed around the ritual rebuilding, and unpack some of the puzzles in the forgotten history of Ise.

This lecture will be hosted via Microsoft Teams. (Computer users may view this event through their web browser, no downloads or sign-ups necessary. If you are on a mobile device, you may be required to download and sign up for the Microsoft Teams app.)

Please check your inbox for emails from the JICC Eventbrite account and click on the "View Now" button to access the online lecture.

Winter in Japan: Music by Koto

Friday, January 22, 2021 | 4:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m. (PDT)
Japan America Society of Chicago
kono@jaschicago.org

Celebrate winter with an exclusive koto performance by Chicago’s very own Tokiko Kimura. Hear the sounds reminiscent of Japanese childhood including: Spring Sea (春の海), Bonfire (焚き火), Thousand Wind (千の風になって) and Sukiyaki (上を向いて歩こう). Enjoy an evening with your family embracing the beautiful sounds of Japan.

New Year J-Film Fest: True Mothers | 朝が来る

Friday, January 22, 2021 4:00 p.m. - Monday, January 25, 2021 4:00 p.m. (PDT)
The Japan Information & Culture Center (JICC), Embassy of Japan in Washington D.C.
jicc@ws.mofa.go.jp

The Japan Information & Culture Center (JICC), Embassy of Japan and the Japan Commerce Association of Washington, D.C., Inc. are thrilled to jumpstart 2021 with our very first online New Year J-Film Fest!For three 72-hour weekend screenings in January, we have selected some amazing films from some of the latest and greatest talents in Japanese cinema.

Japan's Official Submission to the Academy Awards

After a long and unsuccessful struggle to get pregnant, Satoko and her husband decide to adopt a child. Over the next six years, the middle-class couple and their young son Asato settle into a comfortable, albeit routine, life.

The family’s orderly existence is shattered by the arrival of Hikari, a young woman claiming to be Asato’s biological mother, demanding his return. As tensions mount, Satoko grows more and more emboldened to defend her family.

Weaving together multiple timelines and genres with a contemplative pacing and keen sense of place, hallmarks of Kawase’s work, True Mothers is “is a deeply touching celebration of women who assume duties of love, support and compassion” (Awards Watch).

These virtual events are free and open to the online attendees in the US, however registration on Eventbrite is required in order to receive 72-hour streaming access to the virtual screenings via email. Registration for this film will begin on Wednesday, January 6 at 8:00 AM PDT. Register here.

Music Mondays: Cheer up with "Virtual" Concert

Mondays, January 25, 2021 | 12:30 p.m. - 12:55 p.m.*
Japan Foundation Los Angeles
(323) 761-7510

We want to bring some cheer to your lives by music! JFLA presents live music performances via JFLA Facebook LIVE! Every Monday at 12:30pm, talented performers will play their repertoire dedicated specially to you. Just go to JFLA's Facebook page. You don't need to have a Facebook account. Click the link, and the live video will show up on the main page. If you miss the video, you can still find it on JFLA's Facebook or JFLA's YouTube Channel.

*Start times differ depending on performer. Visit JFLA's website for more information.

Performer Schedule:
December 7: Yogetsu Akasaka (Beatboxer/Zen Buddhist Monk)*Live from Japan, Start at 6PM (PT)
December 14: Shigeru Ishikawa (Contrabass)*Live from Japan, Start at 6PM (PT)
January 11: Hana Hibiki Duo (Koto & Flute/ Shakuhachi)
January 25: Honoka (Ukulele)

View past live performances here.

Locating Japan in Theater and Performance Studies Today

Tuesday, January 26, 2021 | 4:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. (PDT)
UCLA Terasaki Center for Japanese Studies

(310) 825-4500 | japancenter@international.ucla.edu

As Theater and Performance Studies in Anglophone academia reckon with generations of Euro-centricity and seek to diversify curricula and research paradigms, Japan--with its rich range of performance forms both traditional and contemporary, and its complex history--offers a compelling site from which to broaden these disciplines. What insights can be brought from Japanese Studies to Theater and Performance to help deepen understandings of Asia beyond passing references to Noh and Kabuki and, conversely, what insights might Performance Studies have to offer new studies on Japan? Bringing together scholars working on Japanese performance forms in both Theater and Asian Studies departments, we discuss the challenges and rewards of bridging research and teaching across disciplines, centuries, and cultures.

Register here.

An Insider’s Introduction to Contemporary Japanese Art

Tuesday, January 26, 2021 | 4:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.
Japan Forum for Innovation and Technology

Over the past few years, the highest-priced living female artist in the world has been 91 year-old Yayoi Kusuma, known for her polka-dotted pumpkins. Meanwhile, since the early aughts the so-called “Japanese Andy Warhol”, Takashi Murakami, has built a global brand and factory around his famous motifs. And yet, Japanese artists are not usually prominent in Museums of Contemporary Art. What explains the seeming contradiction between the small footprint and the huge impact? How does nationality or heritage play into the global successes of these artists? Enjoy a tour through the latest expressions of Japanese art with AJ Kiyoizumi who builds art collections and collectors globally. Register here.

"Virtual" Meditation with Japanese Singing Bowl

Wednesday, January 27, 2021 | 12:30 p.m. - 12:45 p.m.
Japan Foundation Los Angeles
(323) 761-7510

We would like to help during these trying times. Meditation with Japanese Singing Bowl will be offered via JFLA Facebook LIVE! The singing bowl used for this program harmoniously combines the healing qualities of the Tibetan singing bowl and its Japanese traditional singing bowl. Relax and feel your stress dissipate into thin air as the sounds of the singing bowl lead you into a meditative state.
The singing bowl used in this program is a healing musical instrument that Japanese craftsmen designed with the finest of details. Tibetan meditation bowl (a type of Buddhist instrument) has rich harmonic overtones, Japanese traditional singing bowl (also a type of Buddhist instrument) has a beautiful single tone and long sustain. The singing bowl used in this meditation program is a wonderful healing instrument incorporating both the Tibetan and Japanese qualities. Harmonious waves penetrate quickly and deeply, while harmonic overtones delicately realign the body.

Stranger in the Shogun’s City

Thursday, January 28, 2021 | 3:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. (PDT)
Japan America Society of Chicago
kono@jaschicago.org

This talk is an introduction to the vibrant social and cultural life of early nineteenth century Japan, told through the story of an irrepressible woman named Tsuneno, who defied convention to make a life for herself in the big city of Edo (now Tokyo) in the decades before the arrival of Commodore Perry and the fall of the shogunate.

21JPSI Speaker Series: “Training” Foreign Workers, Cultivating Bias: Japan’s Guest Worker System

Thursday, January 28, 2021 | 4:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. (PDT)
Indiana University 21st Century Japan Politics and Society Initiative
jpsi@indiana.edu

Can you believe that it has been almost 30 years since Sailor Moon was first published in the weekly girl’s manga magazine Nakayoshi in 1992?! It and its animation adaptation quickly broke records and became a milestone of ’90s girls’ manga and anime. Sailor Moon next turned into a social phenomenon by reaching far beyond the boundaries of its genre, gaining widespread popularity among adults as well as children, and appealing to all genders and sexual orientations. Then, as it started being exported to other parts of the world, it became many people’s first introduction to Japanese pop culture.

Why was Sailor Moon such a hit when it first appeared, and why is it still so popular today? What led to Sailor Moon‘s rise outside of Japan, and what impact did it have on the generation that grew up with it?

Join our panel discussion with Kumiko Saito, Mari Morimoto, Samantha Close, and Kathryn Hemmann as they explore the history and legacy of Sailor Moon, as well as the fandom and fan culture it helped create in the U.S.

Poll:
Please let us know who your favorite Sailor Moon character is on the Eventbrite page when you register. We will announce the results of the poll during the event and discuss it with the panelists.

Q&A:
The discussion will be followed by a live Q&A. Along with answering the poll, now is your chance to ask the experts a question about Sailor Moon. Please submit your question when you register. Live commentary will also be enabled on the YouTube stream, so you can participate in the Q&A session on air as well.

This is a free event. Registrants will receive the link to the stream via email. The date and time of the event are Eastern Time. Please check your local time zone.

Register here.

Sailor Moon: How These Magical Girls Transformed Our World

Thursday, January 28, 2021 | 5:00 p.m. (PDT)
Japan Foundation New York
info@jfny.org | (212) 489-0299

Can you believe that it has been almost 30 years since Sailor Moon was first published in the weekly girl’s manga magazine Nakayoshi in 1992?! It and its animation adaptation quickly broke records and became a milestone of ’90s girls’ manga and anime. Sailor Moon next turned into a social phenomenon by reaching far beyond the boundaries of its genre, gaining widespread popularity among adults as well as children, and appealing to all genders and sexual orientations. Then, as it started being exported to other parts of the world, it became many people’s first introduction to Japanese pop culture.

Why was Sailor Moon such a hit when it first appeared, and why is it still so popular today? What led to Sailor Moon‘s rise outside of Japan, and what impact did it have on the generation that grew up with it?

Join our panel discussion with Kumiko Saito, Mari Morimoto, Samantha Close, and Kathryn Hemmann as they explore the history and legacy of Sailor Moon, as well as the fandom and fan culture it helped create in the U.S.

Poll:
Please let us know who your favorite Sailor Moon character is on the Eventbrite page when you register. We will announce the results of the poll during the event and discuss it with the panelists.

Q&A:
The discussion will be followed by a live Q&A. Along with answering the poll, now is your chance to ask the experts a question about Sailor Moon. Please submit your question when you register. Live commentary will also be enabled on the YouTube stream, so you can participate in the Q&A session on air as well.

This is a free event. Registrants will receive the link to the stream via email. The date and time of the event are Eastern Time. Please check your local time zone.

Register here.

Online Activities

LEARN JAPANESE

Embassy of Japan JICC Educational Resources and Activities

Japan Information & Culture Center (JICC), Embassy of Japan in Washington D.C.

The Japan Information & Culture Center at the Embassy of Japan in Washington D.C. has prepared their own educational resources for parents, educators, and those studying Japanese during this time. This page will get updated regularly with new information. View their free coloring book and other resources here!

Japan Foundation Learning Materials

Japan Foundation

The Japan Foundation has prepared their own educational resources for parents, educators, and those studying Japanese during this time.

MARUGOTO Plus Japanese Learning

The Japan Foundation

MARUGOTO+ (MARUGOTO Plus) is a website where users can learn about Japanese language and culture based on the contents of the "MARUGOTO: Japanese Language and Culture", the official coursebook of the Japan Foundation, which complies to the JF Standard for Japanese-Language Education.

"KC Yom Yom" for Easy Stories in Japanese

The Japan Foundation Japanese-Language Institute, Kansai

"KC Yom Yom," created by the Japan Foundation Japanese-Language Institute, Kansai, offers free Japanese stories based on the "tadoku" method of learning foreign languages by reading easy books. "Ta (多)" means "a lot" and "doku (読)" means "reading" in Japanese, so tadoku (多読) literally means "read a lot." You can find stories according to your level and listen to each story to improve your listening skills. "NPO Tadoku Supporters" also offers a variety of stories on it website here.



VIRTUAL MUSEUMS

Online Art Exhibitions - Ukiyo-e, featured artist retrospectives, and more

Ronin Gallery

The Ronin Gallery in NY has set up an online art gallery! In addition to the 6-10 exhibitions featured in our New York gallery, Ronin Gallery also curates weekly online Japanese art exhibitions. Drawing from the wide Ronin collection, our exhibitions range from revered ukiyo-e woodblock print artists to blossoming contemporary talents, artist retrospectives and thematic explorations to antique Japanese paintings. Ronin Gallery invites you to browse our online art gallery and share in our excitement for East Asian art.

teamLAB: A Forest Where Gods Live

teamLAB

Check out the online gallery of the latest teamLab Digitized Nature project! This installation explores how non-material digital technology can turn nature into art without harming it.

IJC Museum: Online Art Museum

IJC Museum

The IJC Museum is a virtual museum in the cloud that exhibits the works of remarkable artists representing the Japanese modern art scene. You can view works from all directions with 360-degree freedom and get so close that you can see the subtlest details and even feel the presence of the artists. Artists include Yayoi Kusama, Nerhol, Manabu Ikeda, Tabaimo, Taku Obata, Kohei Nawa, and Hisashi Tenmyouya.

Ghibli Museum

Ghibli Museum, Mitaka

The Studio Ghibli museum has temporarily closed in the efforts of mitigating the spread of COVID-19 in Japan. The museum has released video footage on their YouTube channel of popular rooms in the building such as the prop room used for many of the Ghibli films. Normally, the Ghibli museum does not allow photos or videos to be taken inside the building, so it is the perfect chance to get a look into the museum.

Boro Textiles: Sustainable Aesthetics

Japan Society
Boro (“rags” or “tatters”) are patchwork textiles hand-pieced by peasants in Japan in the 19th and early 20th centuries. The inability to cultivate cotton in the northern climate of Tohoku necessitated the practice of stitching remnants of used fabric into utilitarian items, including blankets, coats and mittens. These hard-used garments – reworked over generations – express essential principles of Japanese ethics and aesthetics, such as an appreciation for distinguished imperfections and the avoidance of waste. For the first time in the U.S., this exhibition assembles over 50 archival pieces from the personal collection of folklorist and cultural anthropologist Chuzaburo Tanaka (1933–2013) presented alongside new portraits by editor-photographer Kyoichi Tsuzuki, designs by pioneers of Japanese avant-garde fashion Rei Kawakubo, Issey Miyake, Yohji Yamamoto, and textile-based works by Susan Cianciolo and Christina Kim – part of a generation of contemporary artists influenced by the aesthetics and ethics of mending, patchwork, and re-use. The installation, designed by New York architecture firm SO–IL, rediscovers this traditional handicraft, its history of survival and ingenuity, and its continued legacy within creative practices today. While our doors are closed, please enjoy a Virtual Video Tour of Boro Textiles: Sustainable Aesthetics, narrated by Director Yukie Kamiya and Assistant Curator Tiffany Lambert of Japan Society Gallery.

The Art of Impermanence: Japanese Works from the John C. Weber Collection and Mr. and Mrs. John D. Rockefeller 3rd Collection

Asia Society New York

Asia Society's gallery is currently closed, but you can still learn more about the exhibition and explore the works on Asia Society's website. Find images from the exhibition, as well as related podcasts and recordings of lectures. This exhibition is supported through the Exhibitions Abroad Support Program.
Impermanence is a pervasive subject in Japanese thought and art. Through masterpieces of calligraphy, painting, sculpture, ceramics, lacquers, and textiles drawn from two of America’s greatest Japanese art collections, this exhibition examines Japan's unique and nuanced references to transience. Objects span from the Jōmon period to the twentieth century. From images that depict the cycle of the four seasons and red Negoro lacquer worn so it reveals the black lacquer beneath, to the gentle sadness evoked in the words of wistfully written poems, the exhibition demonstrates that much of Japan's greatest art alludes directly or indirectly to the transient nature of life.

Painting Edo: Japanese Art from the Feinberg Collection

Harvard Art Museums

Painting Edo at the Harvard Art Museums is a great exhibition that you should not miss. Learn more about the exhibition in their series of videos. The museums have also been active on Facebook and Instagram. This exhibition is supported through the Exhibitions Abroad Support Program.

The Tale of Genji: A Japanese Classic Illuminated

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

This groundbreaking exhibition was part of our Japan 2019 project. You can still learn about this show and view all the exhibition objects on the museum's website. The exhibition catalogue is also available online for free.

The National Gallery of Victoria (NGV) - Japanese Modernism

This gallery located in Melbourne, Australia is offering online and downloadable exhibition resources for student learning experiences about Japanese Modernism in art. They also have virtual tours for other exhibitions in their current collection and video highlights from guest artists!

Digital Exhibition - Yōkai Senjafuda

The University of Oregon’s collection of senjafuda (千社札) is one of the largest in the world! Their digital exhibition focuses on tiny slips of paper that depict Japanese ghosts and monsters known as yōkai (妖怪).

e-Museum: National Treasures & Important Cultural Properties of National Museum, Japan

This website provides high definition images of National Treasures and Important Cultural Properties of Japan, owned by four national museums (Tokyo National Museum, Kyoto National Museum, Nara National Museum and Kyushu National Museum) belonging to the National Institutes for Cultural Heritage.

Enjoy Mori Art Museum @ Home!

The Mori Art Museum is one of the leading contemporary art museums in Tokyo. The museum offers a wide variety of their content online including official photos of installations to past exhibitions.

Renwick Gallery - Chiura Obata: American Modern

Chiura Obata (1885–1975) ranks among the most significant California-based artists and Japanese American cultural leaders of the last century. Check out the online gallery of his artwork on their website!

Google Arts & Culture

Explore museums all over Tokyo virtually through Google. Some collections include online exhibits, panoramic tours, video clips, and more. There is also an Art Camera available which will allow you to zoom into famous works of art. Washington DC's very own Freer and Sackler Gallery at the National Museum of Asian Art has its own online collection here too!

Adachi Museum of Art: The Adachi Museum of Art houses a collection of modern Japanese art. This museum is known for its magnificent Japanese garden.
Chihiro Art Museum: The Chihiro Art Museum Tokyo is a small gallery in Tokyo’s Nerima Ward dedicated to illustrator Chihiro Iwasaki (1918-1974), a Japanese artist renowned for her paintings and illustrations of flowers and children. Chihiro Art Museum’s virtual tour features three exhibitions, including some of Iwasaki’s most famous works.
Fukuoka Art Museum: From traditional Japanese screens to modern art, the Fukuoka Art Museum has a wide collection of approximately 16,000 works from ancient to contemporary. Enjoy Dali, Miro, Chagall, Tomita Kaisen’s scroll paintings and more.
Fukuoka Asian Art Museum: The Fukuoka Asian Art Museum is the only museum in the world that systematically collects and exhibits Asian modern and contemporary art.
Fukuoka City Museum: The Fukuoka City Museum displays the history of Fukuoka and the lifestyle of the people of the area. The museum’s collection includes a variety of sculptures, masks, and ukiyo-e.
Keio University Library: The Keio University Library has a few unique online ukiyo-e exhibitions, including "Give Me Back My Bonito!" and “Discover Tokyo Through Funny Food Ukiyo-e.”
Kioi Art Gallery, Edo Ise-Katagami Kimono Museum: Ise-katagami is the Japanese craft of making paper stencils for dyeing textiles. This museum boasts over 5,000 stencils from the Edo to the Showa periods.
Kobe City Museum: The Kobe City Museum owns nearly 70,000 objects, including a National Treasure comprising 21 items and 6 important Cultural Assets comprising 74 items. The museum includes textiles, silks and screens from the Edo period.
Kobe Fashion Museum: This is the first museum in Japan to specialize in fashion. Enjoy haute couture, textiles, costumes, and other fashion styles from European and Japanese fashion history.
Kyoto National Museum: The Kyoto National Museum is one of Japan's oldest and most distinguished museums. The museum's main focus is pre-modern Japanese art.
Kyoto Prefectural Domoto-Insho Museum of Fine Arts: The works of Insho Domoto (1891-1975), the great Nihonga painter, are preserved and displayed in the museum. The museum is dedicated to his work and features his traditional Japanese paintings to abstract paintings.
Mie Prefectural Art Museum: The Mie Prefectural Art Museum showcases are from the Edo period onward by artists who were either natives of Mie or had a close relationship with Mie, paintings from the Meiji period onward that show the development of modern oil paintings in Japan, or paintings by foreign artists who exerted a strong influence over modern Japanese art, and sketches, studies, watercolors, and other documents that give insight into the creative undertakings of key artists. After Mie Prefecture and Valencia, Spain became sister cities in 1992, the museum also began collecting works by important Spain artists.
MOA Museum of Art: The Mokichi Okada Association Museum of Art promotes a wide range of art and cultural activities. This museum in particular focuses on Rinpa, one of the major historical schools of Japanese paintings.
Museum of the Sakitama Ancient Burial Mounds: This museum has been actively involved in the preservation and maintenance of the Sakitama Kofun Cluster, a nationally designated historical site consisting of ancient burial bounds. View the burial accessories that were discovered at the burial mound of the Inariyama Kofun as well as earthenware called haniwa.
Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Museum: At 11:02 a.m. on August 9, 1945, the sky above Nagasaki was filled by a white flash, and all the clocks stopped. A gigantic mushroom-shaped cloud soared up towards the blue sky. The Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Museum displays a collection of photographs documenting the damage from the bombing.
National Museum of Nature and Science: Enjoy exhibits on anthropology and natural history including the dinosaur evolution, mining, and medicine in Japan.
The Kyoto Costume Institute: The Kyoto Costume Institute collects and preserves outstanding examples of western clothing through the centuries, as well as the historical items related to this area of study. Enjoy seeing different fashion pieces throughout the centuries.
The Museum of Modern Art, Gunma: This museum features ancient Japanese and Chinese art, and a group of works by artists born in Gunma, including Fukuzawa Ichiro, Yamaguchi Kaoru, and Tsuruoka Masao. It also contains a wide range of modern Japanese and modern Western art, contemporary art and textile.
The Museum of Modern Art, Saitama: This museum is the first art museum the architect Kurokawa Kisho designed. It displays a collection of fine artworks from modern Western masters to contemporary Japanese artists.
The Museum of Oriental Ceramics, Osaka: This ceramics museum commemorates the donation of the world-renowned "Ataka Collection" by the 21 companies of the Sumitomo Group. There are various ceramics from around the world located here.
The National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo: The National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo is the foremost museum collecting and exhibiting modern Japanese art.
The National Museum of Western Art, Tokyo: The National Museum of Western Art, Tokyo was built to house the Matsukata Collection, which includes many Impressionist paintings and Rodin's sculptures.
Sagawa Art Museum: The Sagawa Art Museum is home to Raku ware, a type of Japanese pottery traditionally used during tea ceremonies. The collection includes pottery, clay, ceramic and rock pieces.
Sankeien Garden: The Sankeien Garden is a spacious Japanese garden created by Sankei Hara, a successful Yokohama businessman who had built a fortune through his silk business. Enjoy cultural artifacts as well as taking a stroll through the Japanese garden.
Sekido Museum of Art: Sekido Museum of Art was founded in April 2006 to promote international cultural exchange and mutual understanding through artcraft and to enhance Japanese culture. The museum's collection is built upon a group of works collected by Senju Satoh and features clay and ceramic pieces with intricate patterns.
Shizuoka City Tokaido Hiroshige Museum of Art: The Shizuoka City Tokaido Hiroshige Museum of Art focuses on the works of Edo Ukiyo-e artist, Utagawa Hiroshige. Some of Hiroshige's masterpieces include Fifty-Three Stations of the Tokaido, Sixty-Nine Stations of the Kisokaido and One Hundred Famous Views of Edo. Enjoy the internationally loved Ukiyo-e works from Edo to the present here.
Shizuoka Prefectural Museum of Art: The Shizuoka Prefectural Museum of Art displays various paintings to Mount Fuji as well as screen, canvas, and sculpture pieces.
Tachibana Museum: The Tachibana Museum houses cultural properties passed down to the Tachibana family that controlled the Yanagawa clan throughout the Edo Period. The museum displays items that convey the history of the Tachibana family: from a suit of armor that once belonged to family ancestor and first feudal lord of Yanagawa, Muneshige Tachibana, to gold and silver lacquer dispatch boxes, cosmetic utensils and Noh theater costumes.
Tokyo Fuji Art Museum: The Tokyo Fuji Art Museum collection is comprised of some 30,000 Japanese, Eastern and Western artworks, ranging from paintings, prints, photograpy, sculptures, ceramics and lacquer ware to armor, swords and medallions of various periods and cultures.
Tokyo National Museum: The Tokyo National Museum is perhaps the oldest and largest art museum in Japan. This museum collects, houses, and displays a comprehensive collection of art works and antiquities from Japan as well as other Asian countries.
Yamatane Museum of Art: The Yamatane Museum of Art is Japan's first museum dedicated to Nihonga (Japanese-style paintings).

  

EXPERIENCE JAPAN

Taiko Lesson – Learn Obon Festival Drumming

Have you ever wanted to learn how to play Bon Daiko (Japanese Obon festival drumming)? Isaku Kageyama, a taiko instructor at the Los Angeles Taiko Institute, offers free Bon Daiko lessons on his website. The first few lessons will focus on fundamentals and basic patterns, and will progress from there. You can also download music files and sheet music, and use these recordings for free at your local festival.

Learning Daifuku/Sashiko Embroidery with the JICC, Embassy of Japan

Nowadays, the Japanese word boro is as common as wabi-sabi among the textile and fashion cognoscenti. Textile museums around the world have highlighted this unique Japanese patchwork technique originating from the Tōhoku region, establishing it as part of world textile history. Today, contemporary designers like Nakazato Yuima are drawing inspiration from boro in how they approach the construction of their cutting-edge garments.
In her book, Boro: Rags and Tatters from the Far North of Japan, Koide Yukiko explains that originally, boro was born out of necessity in the extreme north of Japan, where cotton cannot grow. Cotton fabric was such a precious commodity that every piece of it was saved for repurposing. It was even passed down through generations as a full garment or even as remnants.
Sashiko is an embroidery technique used on boro items to simultaneously decorate and reinforce the fabric. The story of the Tōhoku region’s former hardship can be found in the beautiful boro patchworks of treasured fabric pieces and their multi-purpose sashiko designs.
Recently, sashiko has gained popularity alongside boro, and it is enjoyed all over the world as a stylish and sustainable approach to fashion and repurposing household items.
Check out #sashiko on Instagram and find more stunning examples!

Free Coloring Activity: Yoroshiku-Girl by Yoshitomo Nara

Japan Society
Download the drawing here (Printable PDF)
Yoroshiku-Girl is feeling colorless - at home, away from her friends, her favorite stores and museums (and Japan Society). Bring her to life with lines, shapes and lots of color!
We are happy to offer Yoroshiku-Girl, a drawing by Yoshitomo Nara for your coloring enjoyment at home. With the artist’s support, we invite you to participate in this creative project for people of all ages. Share your artwork with us online using #JSFromHome for a chance to be featured on the Japan Society social media channels!

Free Coloring Books from Hanshin Railway

Hanshin Electric Railway

The Hanshin Electric Railway has collaborated with MofuMofuDo illustrators to create coloring books featuring iconic locations in Osaka and Kobe. Currently, there are 10 free coloring books available for download!

Travel through Japan with these VR videos: Tokyo, Kyoto, Nagasaki and more

Itching to visit Japan? Unfortunately, due to the Covid-19 coronavirus, we're all staying put indoors. However, with these 360-degree virtual-reality YouTube videos from Simbosi, you can 'travel' through Japan without a plane ticket. Each video puts you in a different destination in Japan – go from the hustle and bustle of Tokyo to Kyushu down south, then follow up with a trip to Japan's traditional crown jewel, Kyoto. Keep an eye out for historical facts in some of the videos – it's like having your own virtual tour guide.

Virtual Tours - Cherry Blossoms Around the World

Explore street views of some of the world's most scenic sakura spots as recommended by local reviewers on Google Maps. Each spot has descriptions and personal quotes from local guides.

Virtual Cherry Blossom Festival

National Cherry Blossom Festival
Like the spirit of Japan-U.S. friendship, the gift of cherry blossoms lives on. This year's National Cherry Blossom Festival is being held as a Virtual Festival, with countless videos and activities that bring the festivities to you. Take a tour of the Tidal Basin during peak bloom or explore activities for kids. As a special treat, the festival includes personally recorded videos by Japanese performers, including Naotaro Moriyama, Anna Sato x Toshiyuki Sasaki, and White Out Tokyo!



VIDEO & AUDIO CLIPS

Stranger in the Shogun's City: A Woman's Life in Nineteenth-Century Japan

The Huntington Library, Art Museum, and Botanical Gardens

Amy Stanley, professor of history at Northwestern University, introduces the vibrant social and cultural life of early nineteenth-century Japan through the story of an irrepressible woman named Tsuneno, who defied convention to make a life for herself in the big city of Edo (now Tokyo) in the decades before the arrival of Commodore Perry and the fall of the shogunate.

Gold Hill Samurai... The Story of the First Japanese Colony On U.S. Soil

Sierra Community Access Television

The full play GOLD HILL SAMURAI is now showing on the Sierra Community Access Television YouTube Channel. (140 minutes) This original play written by Placerville's Jamie Van Camp was performed at American River Conservancy WakamatsuFest150 one year ago. This is the story of the first settlement in America by Japanese immigrants in 1869. This video also headlines the SCA-TV2 YT Wakamatsu/American River Conservancy Playlist which includes SCA-TV2 videos of prior year events at the Wakamatsu Tea and Silk Farm Colony, El Dorado County, CA.

NHK & Tokyo National Museum - The Magic of Japanese Masterpieces

Tokyo National Museum

NHK has partnered up with the Tokyo National Museum's to produce a radio series that delves into the history of Japanese relics and artifacts. You can listen to detailed descriptions and the origin of each art piece while looking at their online gallery.

New Japan Philharmonic Orchestra - Teleworking Performance

New Japan Philharmonic Orchestra

The New Japan Philharmonic Orchestra is a symphony orchestra founded in 1972 and based in Tokyo. They are known for their collaborations with video games such as Super Smash Bros. Melee, Kingdom Hearts, and the Resident Evil series. They also worked on Studio Ghibli soundtrack productions with Joe Hisaishi like Spirited Away and Howl's Moving Castle!

Podcasts to Learn about Japan

Time Out Tokyo

Discover Japanese daily life, food, history, sake and even ghost stories through these engaging podcasts. Featured podcasts include Japan Eats, Uncanny Japan, History of Japan, Voices in Japan, and Sake on Air.

What Bonsai Can Teach Us About Patience

The Huntington Library, Art Museum, and Botanical Gardens

Ted Matson, curator of The Huntington’s bonsai collections, used to be a writer. Whenever he felt writer’s block coming on, he would visit his personal collection of bonsai trees, do a little pruning and pinching and enter a “flow state."

Inevitably, the solution he was seeking would pop into his head. To help us grapple with the frustrations of coronavirus stay-at-home orders, host Giovana Romano Sanchez escorts us deep into the practice of bonsai for a lesson in patience, the concept of time, and respect for the pace of nature in this inaugural episode of the Hear and Now at The Huntington podcast.

 

The Sound of Tea

The Huntington Library, Art Museum, and Botanical Gardens

Enjoy the contemplative nature of a Japanese tea ceremony through sound as Robert Hori, gardens cultural curator, performs the traditional ritual and discusses the intricacies of this venerable art form.

 

STORIES

Haruki Murakami - Free Short Stories to Read

For a limited time only, the New Yorker has made several short stories penned by Haruki Murakami free to read! You can also view another translated short story of his here.



ONLINE COURSES

Japanese-inspired Food Education Course for Students of All Ages

Table for Two

Table for Two has partnered up with Wa-Shokuiku to offer a free a online course! You can learn the principles of Japanese cuisine and food culture, and gain the skills to prepare healthy, nutritious foods to strengthen your bodies and minds.

Free Online Course from Harvard University - Japanese Books: From Manuscript to Print

Harvard Faculty of Arts & Sciences

Take a free course on Japanese Books with materials being drawn from Harvard University's extensive collections. Topics include notable Japanese books and scrolls, binding techniques, and visual storytelling in premodern Japan.

Local Upcoming Events

Arizona Area Events

 

Southern California Area Events

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Lifelines/Timelines: Exploring The Huntington’s Collections Through Bonsai

Saturday, October 17, 2020 - Monday, January 25, 2020
The Huntington Library, Art Museum, and Botanical Gardens
1151 Oxford Rd., San Marino, CA 91108
(626) 405-2100

Installations outside five galleries: Mapel Orientation Gallery, East Library, West Library, Huntington Art Gallery, and Virginia Steele Scott Galleries of American Art

Visitors can discover an expansive new way to look at miniature trees in “Lifelines/Timelines: Exploring The Huntington’s Collections Through Bonsai,” The exhibition asks the question: How do five venerable bonsai trees relate in age and historical significance to important works in The Huntington's library and art collections? With an interdisciplinary approach that only The Huntington could offer, "Lifelines/Timelines" explores the march of time by comparing the age of selected California juniper bonsai alongside benchmarks in the institution's 100-year history, and with significant pieces in the collections. Lines in the grain of natural deadwood sections of these bonsai can be used to calculate the tree's age, much like the rings in a cross-section. Which line of a tree's growth corresponds to the publication of Shakespeare's First Folio in 1623? How does its age relate to the creation of Thomas Gainsborough's masterpiece, The Blue Boy, painted ca. 1770? Each of the exhibition's five bonsai installations, located outside gallery spaces, include an illustrated timeline, interactive elements geared toward children, and other interpretive materials, offering an entirely new perspective on The Huntington's holdings. (Note: the galleries themselves are currently closed due to COVID-19.)

 

Local Ongoing Events

Arizona Area Ongoing Events

First Friday Extended Hours

First Fridays | All Day
Japanese Friendship Garden of Phoenix
1125 N 3rd Ave, Phoenix, Arizona 85003
(602) 274-8700 | info@jfgphx.org

Free admission to the garden. Unique entertainment and Japanese Happy Hour bar every month.

Phoenix First Fridays

First Fridays | Evenings
Fushicho Daiko Dojo
925 Grand Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85007
(602) 350-0343 | info@taikoaz.com

During the evening of the first Friday of every month the dojo opens its doors to the public to come visit and watch our classes and performers and to try some taiko themselves! Come visit us at our dojo at 925 N.W. Grand Avenue in downtown Phoenix. You can’t miss the building as it has a large red mitsudomoe (pictured) on the south wall.

Public Tea Ceremony

Third or Fourth Saturday | Various Times
Japanese Friendship Garden of Phoenix
1125 N 3rd Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85003
(602) 274-8700 | info@jfgphx.org

Authentic tea ceremonies for the public are held on the third Saturday of each month October through June. The ceremonies are presented by Tanko Kai tea group, wearing beautiful kimonos in our Musoan tea house. Guests are met at the entry gate and conducted to the tea house by a docent who explains features in the tea garden and other interesting facts about the tea house itself. *Tea ceremonies require complete silence for a duration of 30 minutes. Guests must be age 12 years or older, as the seating may have other guests apart from your group.

 

Southern California Area Ongoing Events

First Friday Origami Club

First Fridays | 12:00 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.
Storrier Stearns Japanese Garden
270 Arlington Dr, Pasadena, CA 91105
(626) 399-1721 | info@japanesegardenpasadena.com

Origami is one of Japan’s most exciting contributions to world culture and is now practiced by children, adults, artists and scientists all around the world. Join the Origami Club on First Fridays of every month and learn from local origami enthusiast and skilled folder, Nick Cavallo. We will provide origami paper and the spectacular natural setting of our garden to inspire the creation of flowers, fish, birds and other natural wonders ? all folded from paper.

Gardena Bonsai Society

First Fridays | 7:00 p.m.
Nakaoka Community Center
1670 W 162nd St, Gardena, CA 90247
(310) 217-9537

The Gardena Bonsai Society meets regularly at the Nakaoka Community Center on the first Friday of the month at 7 p.m. The Society is a group for the novice and the experienced bonsai artist, with each meeting being highlighted by demonstrations and lectures. Lessons are also available on Wednesday nights. The Annual Bonsai Show is held on the first weekend of May.

Gardena Kawai Sumi-e Club

Tuesdays | 5:30 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.
Nakaoka Community Center
1670 W 162nd St, Gardena, CA 90247
(310) 217-9537

The Kawai Sumi-e Club meets every Tuesday evening from 5:30 p.m. - 9 p.m. at the Nakaoka Community Center. Sumi-e is the Japanese art of black and white painting.

(TEMPORARILY CLOSED) Japanese Book Club

Fourth Saturdays | 2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Little Tokyo Branch Library
203 S Los Angeles St, Los Angeles, CA 90012
(213) 612-0525

Enjoy a discussion in Japanese about the books you've read or share the latest articles that you've found interesting.

(TEMPORARILY CLOSED) Japanese Storytime

First Saturdays | 11:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
Little Tokyo Branch Library
203 S Los Angeles St, Los Angeles, CA 90012
(213) 612-0525

Children, parents, and caregivers, join us for our fun and lively Japanese storytime. Listen to exciting and entertaining stories told in Japanese by our STAR reader.

Japanese Teahouse Tours

Second Tuesdays | 11:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.
The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens
1151 Oxford Rd, San Marino, CA 91108
(626) 405-2100

Learn about the history of Japanese Garden's ceremonial teahouse and the traditions behind its use. Informal tours are offered at 20-minute intervals on the second Monday of every month. General admission; no reservations required.

(TEMPORARILY CLOSED) Origami Club

Fourth Saturdays | 1:00 p.m.
Palisades Branch Library
861 Alma Real Dr, Pacific Palisades, CA 90272
(310) 459-2754

Come join us as Travis Taft, origami folder extraordinaire, will teach the basics of this stress-busting art. Learn some, craft some, and have a great time!

(TEMPORARILY CLOSED) Origami Club

Second Thursdays | 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
John C. Fremont Branch Library
6121 Melrose Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90038
(323) 962-3521

Master Folder Travis Taft teaches the Japanese art of origami to students of all ages (above 7) and all levels. Travis will host Origami Club the second Thursday of each month at 4:00 p.m.

(TEMPORARILY CLOSED) Origami for Teens & Young at Heart

First Thursdays | 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Little Tokyo Branch Library
203 S Los Angeles St, Los Angeles, CA 90012
(213) 612-0525

Join us for a workshop to make origami. Participants will learn about the history of this craft and then make their own origami creations. All supplies will be provided.

Oshaberi Tuesday! おしゃべり火曜!

Tuesdays | 6:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.
Tea N More
7380 Clairemont Mesa Blvd, #111, San Diego, CA 92111
(858) 571-2926 | https://www.meetup.com/SanDiegoJapanese/

Every week, we get together for an informal session, where you can come to practice English or Japanese, socialize about culture, study, or just sit back and relax. All skill levels are welcome! New people show up every week, and we all have a great time. Please be sure to order some food and/or drink so we will continue to be welcomed there. Tell the cashier you are with Japanese Meetup and you'll receive 10% off your order. You can accrue even more savings by using the Fivestars rewards program.

Second Sunday Open Day (Tea Ceremony)

Second Sundays | 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Storrier Stearns Japanese Garden
270 Arlington Dr, Pasadena, CA 91105
(626) 399-1721 | info@japanesegardenpasadena.com

Even though the Storrier Stearns garden is a perfect backdrop for cultural events, festivals and celebrations, Japanese gardens are designed primarily for quiet contemplation and introspection. Our Second Sundays will offer visitors the serenity that has characterized Japanese gardens for centuries, a respite from a hectic world. Chairs and benches will be scattered around the garden and tables will be available for picnics and conversation. Highlighting the day will be tea ceremonies in the Niko-an Teahouse (reserved separately.)

South Coast Bonsai Association Meeting

Fourth Sundays (with exceptions for August, November & December) | 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
South Coast Botanic Garden
26300 Crenshaw Blvd, Palos Verdes Peninsula, CA 90274
Palos Verdes Peninsula, CA 90274 | uedak@sbcglobal.net

The South Coast Bonsai Association meets the fourth Sunday of most months at South Coast Botanic Garden. For additional information contact Ken Ueda.

The Garden's ShinKanAn Teahouse and Garden

Second Saturdays | 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Santa Barbara Botanical Garden
1212 Mission Canyon Rd, Santa Barbara, CA 93105
(805) 682-4726 | sbteahouse@gmail.com

The Teahouse is open every second Saturday of the month from 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. Visitors and members are welcome to experience our ShinKanAn Teahouse and Garden. Trained Teahouse volunteers will be available to share their skills and answer questions about the rich traditions of the Japanese tea ceremony.